Approximately 50% of preschool-aged children in California are enrolled in licensed child-care settings, primarily in day care centers. These children consume a significant portion of their daily nutrition in child-care centers. Previous research has indicated that centers participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) served healthier foods than those not participating in CACFP. Therefore, the goal of this study is to identify and propose policy solutions to overcome the barriers preventing high-quality meals in non-CACFP licensed child-care centers. Study assessment methods will include semi-structured interviews and stakeholder convening. Given the significant federal and state role in child care licensing and CACFP policy, the policy solutions arising from this research have immediate and direct relevance to early childhood obesity prevention.