Diet beverages, or artificially-sweetened beverages (ASBs), became popular over the last few decades, largely due to successful marketing campaigns implying that consumption of these beverages would assist in weight control or weight loss. This review examines the existing evidence on the relationship between the consumption of diet beverages and the risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Findings from the review suggest that the presently available research on human epidemiologic and experimental studies on ASB intake and the risk for obesity and related chronic disease is lacking in rigor and consistency. The author concludes that based on the current scientific evidence, a blanket recommendation to either consume or avoid ASBs cannot be made.