Start Date: February 2014

ID #: 71638

Principal Investigator: Dianne Ward, EdD

Organization: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Funding Round: Round 8

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The Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) was developed in 2002 to help child-care providers improve their food and physical activity environments. Evaluations of NAP SACC have shown it to be effective, but the program’s reliance on trained technical assistance professionals and on in-person delivery limit its potential for large-scale dissemination. “Go NAP SACC” was developed to overcome this challenge, providing tailored web-based tools and resources that allow child-care providers to complete more of the program on their own. This study will evaluate Go NAP SACC to determine if web-based delivery can improve the nutrition environment of child-care centers in low-resource, rural areas of North Carolina. Forty licensed child-care centers in counties with high rates of childhood obesity and poverty will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions: access to the website tools, or assignment to a waitlist control. The centers’ nutrition environments will be assessed before and after exposure to the website tools (four months) to assess any changes in foods and beverages provided and nutrition policies.

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