One hundred percent fruit juice makes up a substantial part of the total fruit intakes of children and is a major contributor to their total nutrient intake. However, fruit juices have energy densities similar to sugar-sweetened beverages and might contribute to excess energy intake, obesity, and weight gain. This paper discusses the results of a study that examined the potential nutritional benefits and economic costs of substituting whole fruit for fruit juice in the diets of U.S. children. Findings indicate the substitution of fruit juice with whole fruits has the potential to reduce energy intake and increase intakes of dietary fiber. It would also likely increase diet costs for schools, child-care providers, and families.