This article examines the impact of the 2009 food package changes for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) on the availability of healthful foods in two lower-income urban neighborhoods in Philadelphia. Each year, WIC provides more than 9 million pregnant and breast-feeding women, infants, and children up to age five with food deemed essential to proper growth and development. Changes to the WIC food package included the addition of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains, and a switch from whole milk to 2% milk for children over two years of age. Researchers found that the availability of healthful foods increased significantly in stores overall, with more substantial increases in WIC-authorized stores following changes to the WIC food package.