Start Date: September 2007

ID #: 63050

Principal Investigator: Dianne Ward, EdD

Organization: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Funding Round: Round 2

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The aim of this study is to create a self-report instrument which will measure the child care nutrition environment and provide evidence for the reliability of scores and validity of inferences from this instrument. By creating a clear, easily understandable instrument that can be used across a range of child care centers to provide reliable and valid assessments of the child care nutrition environment, evaluation efforts focusing on upstream environmental interventions in childcare settings will be enhanced. The target population for this study is multiracial/ethnic preschool children.

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