Published: May 2018

ID #: CAS023

Journal: J Nutr Educ Behav

Authors: Erinosho T, Vaughn A, Hales D, Mazzucca S, Gizlice Z, Ward D

See more related research

Share


This study describes the foods and beverages offered, nutrition practices, and nutrition policies of family child care homes in Mississippi and differences by participation in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). A random sample of family child care homes that enroll 3- to 5-year-olds in Mississippi were examined through a self-report tool. Foods and beverages offered at lunch, provider practices regarding nutrition, and presence or absence of written nutrition polices were measured. This study found providers at CACFP-participating homes reported healthier beverage selections, more healthful nutrition practices, and more written nutrition polices compared with providers at non-CACFP homes.

Related Research

June 2015

Assessing Policies, Practices, and the Built Environment in and Around Family Child Care Homes in Mississippi

In Mississippi, about one-third of children under six years old are cared for in Family Child Care Homes (FCCHs). The purposes of this study are to: 1) assess the nutrition and physical activity practices and policies of FCCHs in Mississippi; 2) explore whether these policies differ by geographic region (rural vs. urban) and participation in More

October 2021

Evidence-Based Recommendations and Best Practices for Promoting Healthy Eating Behaviors in Children 2 to 8 Years

Dietary recommendations are available about what to feed children ages 2 to 8 for optimal health, but relatively little guidance exists about how to feed those children. Because of the discrepancy between young children’s recommended and actual dietary intakes, there is a clear need for such guidance. To address this gap, Healthy Eating Research convened More

August 2021

Caregiver Feeding Practices as Predictors for Child Dietary Intake in Low-Income, Appalachian Communities

The Appalachian region of the U.S. is disproportionately impacted by poverty, obesity, and nutrition-related chronic diseases. Evidence suggests that caregiver feeding practices may promote healthful eating behaviors among children; however, this has not been examined in low-income, rural, Appalachian populations. This study examines caregiver feeding practices as predictors for child diet in low-income Appalachian families, More