Published: May 2018

ID #: CAS029

Journal: J Nutr Educ Behav

Authors: Andreyeva T, Kenney EL, O’Connell M, Sun X, Henderson KE

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This study assessed the dietary quality of lunches and feeding practices in Connecticut child care centers and made comparisons by center participation in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Specifically, overall energy, macronutrient intake, and intake by CACFP meal component were compared with CACFP requirements and recommendations from the Institute of Medicine. Data were collected at randomly selected licensed child care centers using plate waste methods and visual observations of lunches served and consumed. The study found the CACFP centers were more likely to offer family-style service and have staff eat the same foods as the children. Also, children in non-CACFP centers consumed more saturated fat and trans fats and less milk than did children in CACFP centers. Overall, differences were found between the CACFP-participating centers and the non-participating centers in regard to provider behavior during meals, characteristics of food offerings, and child intake.

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