Published: July 2016

ID #: CAS020

Publisher: Nemours Children's Health System

Authors: Julie Shuell, MPA

See more related research

Share


In the early 2000s, states began developing Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a structural approach to improve the quality of Early Care and Education (ECE) programs. QRIS are voluntary or required systems designed to reach large numbers of ECE providers, particularly those serving lower-income children receiving child-care subsidies. The topics covered by QRIS (e.g., curriculum, workforce development, health and safety) vary by state. This study aimed to learn about strategies to promote healthy eating, breastfeeding, physical activity, and limit screen time (referred to as “HEPA”) in state QRIS implementation. The purpose of this report is to provide data, recommendations, and case study examples to state-level administrators and stakeholders on how to more effectively use QRIS as a lever for change in childhood obesity prevention. It also identifies opportunities for continued research to advance childhood obesity prevention in ECE settings. This report summarizes information learned from 24 states that have identified practices related to HEPA they want to promote via the state QRIS. Case studies from seven states (Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin) highlight strategies to support ECE providers’ childhood obesity prevention efforts.

Related Research

June 2015

State Quality Rating and Improvement Systems: Analysis of Strategies to Support Achievement of Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Best Practices in Early Care and Education Settings

In the 1990s, states began developing Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a structural approach to improve the quality of early care and education (ECE) programs. Nemours’ experience implementing obesity prevention efforts in nine states has demonstrated that QRIS systems may be leveraged to promote childhood obesity prevention in addition to school readiness and More

February 2022

Marketing of sugar-sweetened children’s drinks and parents’ misperceptions about benefits for young children

Despite expert recommendations, U.S. parents often serve sugar-sweetened children’s drinks, including sweetened fruit-flavored drinks and toddler milks, to young children. This qualitative research explored parents’ understanding of common marketing tactics used to promote these drinks and whether they mislead parents to believe the drinks are healthy and/or necessary for children. We conducted nine focus groups More

January 2022

Front-of-package claims & imagery on fruit-flavored drinks and exposure by household demographics

Young children regularly consume sugary fruit drinks, in part because parents may falsely believe they are healthful due to front-of-package (FOP) claims and imagery. The goal of this study was to assess: 1) the prevalence of FOP claims/imagery on fruit-flavored beverages purchased by U.S. households with 0-5-year-olds, and 2) proportional differences in beverages purchased with More