Published: December 2021

ID #: CAS074

Publisher: University of Washington

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This study aimed to assess programmatic changes made by the Washington State WIC program to offer remote services and more flexible food options, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Twelve focus groups with 52 WIC staff (10 state, 42 local) were conducted in Dec 2020 to Feb 2021, and interviews were conducted with 40 WIC participants across 20 WIC agencies in March to April 2021. The study found that participation in WIC increased during the pandemic, staff and participants were highly satisfied with remote services, and participants appreciated the expanded food options.

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