There is growing interest in the role of the environment in promoting or hindering healthy eating. It has been suggested that individual change is more likely to be facilitated and sustained if the environment within which choices are made supports healthful food options. While there has been a shift in attention to environmental and policy determinants of eating behavior, the evidence to date is limited. This article reviews research that examines factors having an influence on food choices in: 1) social environments, such as family, peers, and social networks; 2) physical environments, including schools, child care, worksites, retail food stores, and restaurants; and 3) macro-environments, such as socioeconomic status, cultural norms and values, food marketing, and food and agricultural policy. Future research directions are also discussed.