Published: July 2014

ID #: CAS013

Authors: The California Center for Public Health Advocacy

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The California City Soda Tax Calculator is an online tool that generates estimates of how much revenue a sugar-sweetened beverage tax would raise for incorporated California cities with populations over 25,000 (based on 2010 Census data). The calculator allows for a range of sugar-sweetened beverage taxes from ½ cent to 2 cents per ounce. The researchers who created this tool used the most recently available public and proprietary data on beverage consumption, population, pricing, and socio-demographic information on the variation in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption to populate the calculator.

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