Start Date: February 2020

ID #: 86816

Principal Investigator: Kristina H Lewis, MD, MPH, SM

Organization: Wake Forest University Health Sciences

Funding Round: HER Round 12

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The healthcare sector is a promising venue for systems interventions to reduce children’s sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, but clinical staff lack the time for high-intensity in-person interventions. We propose to develop and pilot a parent-informed, technology-enabled healthcare system-based intervention. The goals of the intervention are to: reduce SSB consumption, promote guideline-appropriate levels of fruit juice consumption, and increase water consumption, while reducing racial/ethnic disparities in these behaviors among children 1-8 years old. Our 6-month health-system delivered intervention will consist of 4 components: (1) a 5-minute educational video; (2) a family water promotion toolkit including water bottles for all family members; (3) a mobile phone app to help journal beverage consumption and “gamify” healthful changes; and (4) a series of 14 interactive voice response calls to parents to assist with goal setting, motivation, and problem solving.

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