Start Date: April 2021

ID #: 283-4134

Principal Investigator: Kristina Henderson Lewis, MD, MPH, SM

Organization: Wake Forest University Health Sciences

Funding Round: SSB4

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This study seeks to partner with the local Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) to pair an electronic health record (EHR)-based sugar-sweetened beverage screener with a technology-based intervention in order to improve intervention reach and uptake in nutritionally at-risk infants and young children. Specific aims include: (1) Enhance EHR data infrastructure to identify WIC participants ages 6 months to 4 years who overconsume sugar-sweetened beverages or fruit juice, and create a data linkage to allow WIC staff to access the EHR of WIC-enrolled children; (2) Use semi-structured interviews with WIC parents, WIC staff and pediatricians to identify a shared messaging strategy for beverage choice compatible with guidelines and current WIC packages; and (3) Pilot test the health system intervention + WIC communication strategy in a small randomized trial among 30 WIC-enrolled families.

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