Start Date: April 2021

ID #: 283-4138

Principal Investigator: Summer Rosenstock, PhD, MHS

Organization: Johns Hopkins University Center for American Indian Health

Funding Round: SSB4

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This research extends follow up on Native American children enrolled in the Prevention of Early Childhood Obesity 1 (PECO1) study 2017-2019 to determine whether positive impacts of the Family Spirit Nurture intervention on infant sugar sweetened beverage intake and infant growth are sustained through 5 years of age. It also examines point of use water filter impact on SSB/water intake and children’s weight status in the absence/presence of prior Family Spirit Nature intervention. Specific aims include: (1) Determine the longer-term effectiveness of the brief Family Spirit Nurture intervention through 5 years of age; and (2) Examine the impact of point-of-use water filters, employed as COVID-19 emergency water response efforts, on children’s water intake and SSB consumption.

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