Published: April 2020

ID #: CAS050

Publisher: Healthy Eating Research and Institute for Health Research and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago

Authors: Asada Y, Sanghera AK, Chriqui JF

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The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was signed into law on December 10, 2015, reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA created an opportunity to broaden accountability beyond traditional subjects, such as math, to potentially focus on health and wellness in schools. States could select health and wellness-related indicators, and identify strategies and initiatives throughout their ESSA Plans to improve the school health environment. Under ESSA states were also required to develop and disseminate statewide report cards that included school and student performance and progress metrics. Few studies have examined how states have included health and wellness into their approved plans and report cards. The purpose of this study was to understand the health and wellness provisions that were prioritized in ESSA State Plans and state report cards. ESSA State Plans and report cards for each of the 50 states and D.C. were collected, coded, and analyzed. The findings are reported in this chart book:

A companion research brief examines health and wellness provisions addressed by State Plans and report cards:

Three state case studies were also developed, highlighting exemplary states:

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