Published: February 2011

Authors: Atkins Center for Weight and Health, University of California, Berkeley, California Food Policy Advocates, and Samuels & Associates

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The survey was designed to be self-completed by child-care providers of 2-5 year old children at preschools, centers or family daycare homes. Adapted from the NAP SACC tool validated by Benjamin et al (2007), it assesses practices related to both feeding (28 items) and physical activity (13 items). Added was a frequency checklist of 21 foods and beverages served to children on the day preceding the survey, including those provided by the site and those brought by parents, listed by eating occasion (breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack). The survey format, wording and length were pilot-tested with a convenience sample of 8 child-care providers. It takes approximately 20 minutes to complete and is available in English and Spanish

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