Start Date: April 2021

ID #: 283-4135

Principal Investigator: Kim Gans, PhD, MPH, LDN

Organization: University of Connecticut

Funding Round: SSB4

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This study seeks to explore the barriers, facilitators, and feasible strategies to increase drinking water access, availability, and intake in family childcare homes (FCCH). Specific aims include: (1) Conduct provider focus groups to determine barriers and strategies to improve water access/intake in FCCH; (2) Conduct intervention pilot with 40 providers operating FCCH in low income neighborhoods in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut that care for more than two children aged 6-60 months, including pre-surveys, creating a core package of strategies, and conducting post-study surveys; and (3) Conduct post-qualitative interviews with providers to assess feasibility/acceptability of intervention strategies and future suggestions.

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