Start Date: March 2009

ID #: 65839

Principal Investigator: Tamara Dumanovsky, PhD

Co-Principal Investigator: Cathy Nonas, MS, RD, CDE

Organization: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Funding Round: Rapid-Response Round 1

See more related research

Share


The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) approved calorie labeling for restaurant chains with 15 or more stores nationally as part of the city’s effort to combat obesity. This regulation requires that calories are posted on menu boards; it is intended to increase prominence of calorie information at point-of-purchase to help consumers make healthier food choices. This requirement may also encourage chains to reformulate menu items, offer healthier items and change promotional materials to emphasize healthier options. This research study will survey adult customers and collect receipts at a random sample of fast-food restaurants after enforcement of calorie labeling regulations. Results from this post-regulation survey will be compared with pre-regulation data collected in the spring of 2007. The target for each of the 275 locations is 50 participants for a total of 13,750 surveys and receipts; for the pre-regulation study, 1,865 surveys and receipts were collected. Survey data will be analyzed to assess changes pre-post regulation in: (1) mean calories purchased overall and by fast food chain, (2) percentage of customers reporting that they saw calorie information, and (3) percentage of customers reporting that calorie information affected their purchase. Subgroup analyses, as appropriate, will include demographics, chain and calorie information posting mode.

Related Research

July 2011

Changes in Energy Content of Lunchtime Purchases from Fast Food Restaurants After Introduction of Calorie Labelling: Cross Sectional Customer Surveys

This article assesses the impact of fast food restaurant menu labeling on the calorie content of individual lunchtime purchases of customers in New York City. Researchers found that, for the full survey sample, mean calories purchased did not change from before to after regulation. However, three major fast-food chains showed significant reductions in average calories More

April 2022

A click too far from fresh foods: A mixed methods comparison of online and in-store grocery behaviors among low-income households

A recent policy in the U.S. authorized monthly benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to be used online to increase grocery access and promote healthy eating. This study examined online grocery attitudes and purchasing behaviors among low-income SNAP-eligible households with young children with and without online grocery experience. An explanatory sequential mixed methods More

April 2022

Food Marketing Practices of Major Online Grocery Retailers in the United States, 2019-2020

Food marketing influences consumers’ preferences for and selection of marketed products. Although a substantial body of research has described food-marketing practices in brick-and-mortar stores, no research has examined food marketing in online grocery retail despite its growing importance as a source of food-at-home purchases. This study aimed to develop and apply a coding instrument to More