Start Date: September 2011

ID #: 69299

Principal Investigator: Natasha Frost, JD

Co-Principal Investigator: Melissa Rodgers, JD, EdM

Organization: Public Health Law Center, Inc.

Funding Round: Round 6

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This project will provide new data about the potential for local governments to take meaningful action to prevent childhood obesity through policy implementation in child-care settings. Because local laws often serve as drivers of state law, this research will help inform childhood obesity prevention policy both at state and local levels around the nation. This study aims to: 1) determine the scope of local government authority to impose nutrition and physical activity standards in child-care settings in all 50 states; 2) examine specific local government regulations and other strategies for addressing nutrition and physical activity; and 3) identify examples of promising or innovative local government practices. Investigators will use legal analytical methods to research and examine state and local laws relating to nutrition and physical activity standards for child care. Final products will include: 1) a simple, accessible 50-state database showing which states permit local child-care regulation and to what extent, and 2) analyses and summaries of promising and innovative practices in local child-care regulation designed to prevent childhood obesity.

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