Start Date: November 2021

See more related research

Share


In 2018, Healthy Eating Research (HER)—a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)—developed a national research agenda to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and increase access to and consumption of safe drinking water among 0- to 5-year-olds. Through this process, it became clear that a lack of consistent recommendations for beverage consumption in early childhood was one barrier to shifting consumption patterns. In response, HER convened an expert panel of representatives from key national health and nutrition organizations—the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and the American Heart Association—to develop a joint consensus statement on what children ages 0 to 5 should drink as part of a healthy diet. The resulting consensus statement was released in September 2019, along with a technical report outlining the scientific evidence and a suite of consumer-facing materials at HealthyDrinksHealthyKids.org. A summary of key panel findings and recommendations can be found below:

HER is currently conducting implementation research among health care practitioners (e.g., Pediatricians, Pediatric Dentists, Registered Dietitian Nutritionists) to inform the development of continuing education content that will educate practitioners about the HER beverage recommendations and support implementation in practice. A mixed-methods approach using surveys (quantitative) and focus groups (qualitative) will be used to better understand the following:

  1. current patient education/counseling practices on beverage topics;
  2. perspectives on the recommendations for young children’s beverage consumption; and
  3. perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing the recommendations in practice.

If you have questions about this research, please email us at: healthyeating@duke.edu

Related Research

January 2023

Policy, system, and environmental interventions addressing obesity and diet-related outcomes in early childhood education settings: A systematic review

Early childhood education (ECE) settings play an important role in child dietary intake and excess weight gain. Policy, systems, and environment (PSE) approaches have potential to reduce disparities in children at higher risk for obesity. The purpose of this review was to (1) characterize the inclusion of populations at higher risk for obesity in ECE More

December 2022

Water is K’é: A Community-Based Intervention to Increase Healthy Beverage Consumption by Navajo Preschool Children

This research brief gives an overview of the Water is K’é intervention, conducted among Navajo Nation families. The intervention was delivered by early care and education teachers to households with children ages 2-5, and covered the cultural importance of water, health benefits of water, and alternatives to sugary drinks. At baseline, more than 70% of children already More

December 2022

Experiences pertaining to child nutrition and care provision among early care and education stakeholders, sponsors, and center directors during the COVID-19 pandemic: A multi-method study

This study used multiple methods (interviews, survey) to assess the experiences of stakeholders, sponsors, and center-based early care and education (ECE) program directors pertaining to child nutrition and the provision of child-care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected across four states. Thematic analyses of interviews and descriptive methods were used to analyze the data More