The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a brief home-visiting approach, Family Spirit Nurture (FSN), on sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, responsive parenting and infant feeding practices, and optimal growth through 12 months post partum. This study was a 1:1 randomized clinical trial comparing FSN with an injury prevention education control condition in a reservation-based community. Participants were Navajo mothers 13 years or older with infants younger than 14 weeks. The 6-lesson FSN curriculum, delivered 3 to 6 months post partum by Navajo paraprofessionals, targeted optimal responsive and complementary feeding practices and avoidance of SSBs. The control group received 3 injury prevention lessons. Mothers who received the Family Spirit Nurture infant nutrition and responsive feeding home-visiting intervention vs those who did not reported feeding children substantially fewer sugar-sweetened beverages and having better responsive feeding practices. In turn, their infants had lower body mass index z scores. Results of this trial suggest that a home-visiting intervention created in partnership with and for Native American individuals is an effective strategy for promoting healthy infant feeding and growth in the first year of life.