Start Date: January 2013

ID #: 70602

Principal Investigator: Lucia Leone, PhD

Organization: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Funding Round: New Connections Round 6

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This study will evaluate an intervention delivered by community partners, the “Veggie Van” mobile market, a van service that sells weekly boxes of reduced-cost, fresh, North Carolina-grown fruits and vegetables and provides nutrition education, taste testing, and cooking demonstrations. Specific aims of the study are to: 1) determine the impact of the Veggie Van on children’s diets by measuring parent-reported child intake of fruits, vegetables, and added sugars at home via multi-pass 24-hour dietary recalls as well as parent reported child attitudes toward consuming fresh fruits and vegetables; 2) analyze the mechanisms by which the Veggie Van affects children’s diet using Veggie Van purchasing data and grocery store receipts for each child’s household; and 3) assess parents’ self-reported home food offerings and preparation practices and their self-efficacy regarding preparing and serving fresh fruits and vegetables. Researchers will use a randomized controlled trial design with 12 sites (e.g., child-care centers, lower-income housing, churches) located in lower-income or low food access areas (6 intervention, 6 control). Data will be collected from approximately 180 parents with a child ages 3-10 years (15 at each site).

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