To address diet quality disparities in low-income families, policymakers and health experts recommend strategies such as financial incentives to promote consumption of fruits and vegetables (FVs). Real-time incentives for purchasing FV and variable incentives are promising, untested strategies to improve families’ diets and health. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of financial incentives delivered in real-time at the point of purchase, on low-income consumers’ purchase of FVs, FV consumption,diet quality, and weight/BMI. The study will test variable levels of incentives compared to static incentives and a no-incentive control condition. Shoppers from 300 low-income families living in Philadelphia will be recruited. Adults must use SNAP or be SNAP-eligible, be the primary household shopper, shop at a participating store,and have at least one child aged 2-17 living in the home.