Published: September 2013

ID #: 1071

Journal: J Pediatr

Authors: Perry CL, Creamer MR

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The large increases in the prevalence of cigarette smoking and obesity in the 20th century are associated with changes in tobacco and food products, as well as social and physical environments that support or discourage smoking, unhealthy dietary intake, and sedentary behaviors. This paper focuses on several of the primary factors responsible for the increase in cigarette smoking and examines whether those factors might also be involved in increased childhood obesity rates in the United States.

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