Research & Publications | Healthy Eating Research

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Evidence-Based Recommendations and Best Practices for Promoting Healthy Eating Behaviors in Children 2 to 8 Years

Dietary recommendations are available about what to feed children ages 2 to 8 for optimal health, but relatively little guidance exists about how to feed those children. Because of the discrepancy between young children’s recommended and actual dietary intakes, there is a clear need for such guidance. To address this gap, Healthy Eating Research convened More

Date: October 2021

Resource Type: Expert Panel Report

Focus Areas: Diet Quality & Healthy Weight Early Childhood

Caregiver Feeding Practices as Predictors for Child Dietary Intake in Low-Income, Appalachian Communities

The Appalachian region of the U.S. is disproportionately impacted by poverty, obesity, and nutrition-related chronic diseases. Evidence suggests that caregiver feeding practices may promote healthful eating behaviors among children; however, this has not been examined in low-income, rural, Appalachian populations. This study examines caregiver feeding practices as predictors for child diet in low-income Appalachian families, More

Date: August 2021

Resource Type: Journal Article

Focus Areas: Diet Quality & Healthy Weight Early Childhood

Improving the actionable research base for health equity in breastfeeding by assessing an intervention to increase rates in minority populations

Breastfeeding equity is a critical component of nutrition-related equity. Breastfeeding rates in the United States are strongly correlated with poverty and race. Communities and Hospitals Advancing Maternity Practices (CHAMPS) is a multi-sectoral, policy, system, and environmental initiative which has significantly increased breastfeeding rates among black populations. CHAMPS was launched in Mississippi (MS) in 2014. Since More

Date: February 2020

Resource Type: Grant Summary

Focus Areas: Diet Quality & Healthy Weight Early Childhood

Getting Children to Eat a Variety of Healthy Foods Starts Early in Life

Childhood is an especially important time to promote the acceptance of healthier foods given the oversaturation of unhealthy modern food environments, poor diet quality in young children, and the high prevalence of nutrition-related diseases in many nations. This issue brief is based on a narrative review, published in Obesity Reviews, on how children learn food preferences during More

Date: December 2017

Resource Type: Research Brief

Focus Areas: Diet Quality & Healthy Weight Early Childhood

Promoting Healthy Food Preferences From the Start: A Narrative Review of Food Preference Learning From the Prenatal Period Through Early Childhood

Childhood is an especially important time to promote the acceptance of healthier foods given the oversaturation of unhealthy modern food environments, poor diet quality in young children, and the high prevalence of nutrition-related diseases in many nations. This review relies on a search of the literature from 2007 to 2016 on how children learn food More

Date: December 2017

Resource Type: Journal Article

Focus Areas: Diet Quality & Healthy Weight Early Childhood

Barriers to Equity in Nutritional Health for U.S. Children and Adolescents: A Review of the Literature

This review summarizes growing evidence of disparities in the social and physical environments of U.S. children and adolescents that likely contribute to increased risk for obesity and poor nutrition. The review examines literature on disparities in nutrition and healthy food access in school, child-care, and residential neighborhood environments, food production and marketing practices, and cultural More

Informing the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forthcoming Regulations on Dietary Guidelines for Preschoolers

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is in the process of writing new regulations for the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in response to the passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Regulations are expected to draw heavily upon recommendations made in the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) 2010 report on More