Economies of Size in Production Agriculture

The concept of economies of size refers to the ability to lower cost of production by increasing production. This article discusses economies of size in production agriculture and the consequences economies of size have on food production and rural America’s future.

Food Systems and Public Health Disparities

This article reviews literature examining the impact food systems have on creating and exacerbating health disparities in the United States. It highlights directions for future research and policies to address the health disparities created by food systems.

The Federal Child Nutrition Commodity Program: A Report on Nutritional Quality

This report found that school districts fail to take advantage of healthier foods offered by the federal child nutrition commodity program, despite improvements in the nutritional quality of foods offered to schools by USDA. The study found that, in California, meat and cheese products accounted for more than 82% of the dollars spent on commodity More

Creating Healthy Food and Eating Environments: Policy and Environmental Approaches

Individual behavior to make healthy choices can occur only in a supportive environment with accessible and affordable healthy food choices. This article presents an overview of food environments and strategies for creating healthy eating environments. An ecological framework is presented for conceptualizing the many food environments and conditions that influence food choices, followed by a More

The Farm Bill and Public Health: An Overview

This paper was written before the passage of the 2007 Farm Bill in December 2007, but the text effectively describes how this new bill (written in anticipation of the legislation’s passage) affects not only farmers and rural communities but the environment, public health, and even socioeconomic variables. In addition to presenting a background on the More

The Role of Schools in Obesity Prevention

Schools can play an important part in the national effort to prevent childhood obesity. More than 95 percent of American youth aged 5 to 17 are enrolled in school, and no other institution has as much continuous and intensive contact with children during the first two decades of life. Schools can promote good nutrition, physical More