Published: February 2007

ID #: 1005

Publisher: Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Authors: Muller M, Schoonover H, Wallinga D

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This paper describes some of the ways that agricultural policies influence what foods (and how much of them) are produced and eaten in the United States. In doing so, the authors identify key factors that contribute to the negative trends in obesity and also offer possible strategies for revising policies to reverse these trends.

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