Start Date: February 2010

ID #: 67307

Principal Investigator: Adam Becker, PhD, MPH

Co-Principal Investigator: Maryann Mason, PhD

Organization: Childrens Memorial Hospital

Funding Round: Rapid-Response Round 2

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In the fall of 2009, the Chicago Board of Health will adopt changes to child-care regulations intended to improve nutrition standards, establish minimum time requirements for physical activity and set maximum time requirements for screentime. During a two-year voluntary phase-in period child-care providers will receive education and training to facilitate compliance. This study will evaluate the effects of child-care regulation changes on child-care practices and examine how center characteristics influence compliance. Researchers will use a two-group, non-randomized design with two waves of data collection to study the impact of voluntary regulation compliance and a qualitative case-study approach to investigate factors that facilitate and constrain compliance. Study results will provide implementation guidance as the policy becomes mandatory within the two-year framework.

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