Start Date: April 2021

ID #: 283-4136

Principal Investigator: Uriyoan Colon-Ramos, ScD, MPA

Organization: George Washington University

Funding Round: SSB4

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The study uses a systems science approach to identify upstream strategies that can support sustained changes in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and water in a low-income, predominantly Hispanic community. This research is designed to generate information crucial for the development of robust multilevel systems recommendations that are contextually and culturally appropriate. Specific aims include: (1) To understand the barriers/facilitators to sustained beverage replacement by conducting focus group discussions with Hispanic parents of infants and toddlers; (2) To build capacity in systems thinking among diverse stakeholders that serve Early Head Start families, and parents, using community-based systems dynamics processes; and (3) To identify and evaluate promising intervention strategies that address structural barriers/and enhance facilitating factors for reducing sugar-sweetened beverage and promoting water consumption.

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