Start Date: September 2007

ID #: 63052

Principal Investigator: Gary Foster, PhD

Organization: Temple University

Funding Round: Round 2

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This project will evaluate the efficacy of a community-based, environmental intervention in urban corner stores located near schools. By targeting multiple aspects of the corner store environment (e.g., social, educational, food availability), the goal of this intervention is to decrease the purchase of high calorie snacks and beverages and increase the percentage of healthy snacks and beverages offered at the store. Changes in the prevalence and incidence of overweight and obesity among the children over the two-year study period will also be assessed. The target population is elementary school students, primarily African American, in an urban setting.

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