Published: April 2012

ID #: 67296

Journal: Afterschool Matters

Authors: Wiecha JL, Hall G, Gannett E, Roth B

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This paper discusses the results of a qualitative study which explored childhood obesity and healthy eating concepts among out-of-school time program administrators. Researchers found that while program administrators were concerned about childhood obesity, they identified four main barriers to serving healthy foods: food procurement, budget, staff issues, and facilities. They also found that while having clear, consistent healthy menu guidelines across organizations and nationally would focus efforts and reduce confusion, it alone will not be enough. High-quality staff training, accountability structures, and incentives are also needed to promote and sustain improvements.

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