Start Date: November 2020

ID #: CAS075

Organization: University of Georgia

Project Lead: Caree Cotwright

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The overall goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive, eLearning beverage policy training (iBevSmart) paired with eCoaching (technical assistance consultation and resources) for ECE centers in Georgia. The iBevSmart guided training features four modules on water, milk, juice, and SSBs, and includes an interactive avatar, videos, and engagement activities. The specific aims are to 1) assess ECE center director and teacher knowledge related to serving healthy beverages; 2) assess changes in beverage policy implementation scores at ECE centers from baseline to post-intervention, and 3) assess ECE center director and teacher self-efficacy to communicate healthy beverage messages to young children and parents.

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