Published: November 2012

ID #: 1063

Journal: ISRN Public Health

Authors: Rutten LF, Yaroch AL, Patrick H, Story M

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Although food insecurity and obesity have historically been viewed as separate public health issues, there is growing interest in the seemingly contradictory association between these two issues. In this paper, authors discuss the findings from research examining associations between food insecurity and obesity in the U.S. and the need for greater synergy between food insecurity initiatives and national obesity prevention public health goals. The authors identify the common ground between these two nutrition-related public health issues and discuss the need for research and advocacy communities to align efforts around the shared goal of improving the health of at-risk populations.

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