Published: March 2013

ID #: CAS010

Publisher: Healthy Eating Research

Authors: Healthy Eating Research

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Beverage choices contribute significantly to dietary and caloric intake in the United States. Choosing healthy beverages and other lower-calorie options, instead of high-calorie, sugar-sweetened beverages, has great potential to help Americans reduce caloric intake, improve diet quality, and reduce their risk for obesity. This document outlines a comprehensive set of age-based recommendations to define healthier beverages. Implementation of the recommendations for healthier beverages across a variety of places and environments such as child care, schools, workplaces, parks, recreational facilities, and hospitals will help improve the health of all Americans.

Download a table version of the recommendations here.

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