Start Date: February 2020

ID #: 86827

Principal Investigator: Helen Margellos-Anast, MPH

Organization: Sinai Urban Health Institute

Funding Round: HER Round 12

See more related research

Share


The Special Supplemental Nutrition program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federally-funded nutrition assistance program supporting low-income women, infants, and children. The Farmers Market Nutrition Program (FMNP) provides WIC clients with coupons to purchase fruits and vegetables from approved farmers markets in addition to their regular WIC benefits. Research is inconclusive about the extent to which FMNP coupons are redeemed, with some evidence that redemption rates are lower in inner-city communities. This project aims to: 1) better understand the program in practice, including documentation of decision-making, and 2) examine facilitators and barriers to coupon redemption among clients of three Chicago-based WIC clinics and their associated nutritional impact on women and children. The study will collect data on a variety of program metrics such as: the number of clients receiving coupons and the percent of coupons redeemed. Facilitators and barriers to coupon redemption will be assessed using interviews, focus groups, and surveys. Changes in healthy food consumption will be estimated between pre- and post-coupon distribution time points, comparing the change in eating patterns between those who used coupons and those who did not receive coupons. The project will culminate in a framework to improve local FMNP implementation. Additionally, the project will inform state and national WIC policies and strategies to improve nutrition among pregnant and post-partum mothers and their children.

Related Research

September 2022

Implementing SNAP During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Perspectives from the National Network of State SNAP Administrators

SNAP was a critical component of the COVID-19 pandemic response. The beginning of the pandemic saw the largest increase in applications in the program’s history, and the pandemic fundamentally altered how SNAP agencies deliver benefits, interact with participants, and provide supportive services. The goal of this research was to examine SNAP implementation during the first More

September 2022

State Implementation of SNAP Waivers and Flexibilities During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Perspectives From State Agency Leaders

This study aimed to describe state agencies’ implementation of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, barriers and facilitators to SNAP implementation, and recommendations to improve SNAP implementation. This study was qualitative, using 7 semistructured, virtual focus groups in April 2021 with state-level SNAP administrators and supportive services More

September 2022

Simplification of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Recertification Processes and Association With Uninterrupted Access to Benefits Among Participants With Young Children

In the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), families may temporarily lose benefits for which they are still eligible because of administrative issues. This lapse in benefits, referred to as churning, increases the risk of food insecurity for families, which is linked with poorer health. This study examined the rate of churning among SNAP participants with More