Start Date: March 2019

ID #: 76295

Principal Investigator: Jennifer Woo Baidal, MD, MPH

Organization: Columbia University

Funding Round: Round 11

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The first 1,000 days describes the period from pre-pregnancy through age 2 years, and is increasingly recognized as a critical period for development of childhood obesity. The overall goal of this study is to test mobile technology-based ecologic momentary interventions (EMIs) to deliver policy-relevant health messages among families living in Washington Heights, a low-income New York City neighborhood with high prevalence of childhood obesity. The proposed research will result in new avenues for reaching families in future interventions to promote healthy beverage intake during the first 1,000 days.

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