Start Date: September 2008

ID #: 65070

Principal Investigator: Lisa Harnack, DrPH, MPH, RD

Co-Principal Investigator: Simone French, PhD

Organization: University of Minnesota

Funding Round: Round 3

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This research will evaluate the influence of two low-cost approaches to serving meals in child care programs on children’s dietary intake. Specifically, a randomized crossover design experiment will be conducted to examine whether serving fruits and non-starchy vegetables in advance of other menu items at lunch may increase children’s fruit and vegetable consumption and moderate energy intake. Also, the study will determine whether pre-plating meals is a useful strategy for promoting fruit and vegetable consumption and moderating energy intake in comparison with family style meal service. If found to be effective in promoting healthier dietary intake, these food service approaches could have broad public health impact because of the relative ease with which each may be implemented.

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