Published: January 2008

ID #: 57936

Journal: Ann Am Acad Pol Soc Sci

Authors: Graff SK

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How does First Amendment protection affect food and beverage marketing in schools? This study concludes that while the First Amendment keeps a tight rein on those who want to restrict advertising to adults, it does give public school districts significant leeway to curb advertising directed at their student bodies.

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