Published: August 2014

ID #: 69819

Publisher: University of California at Berkeley, Atkins Center for Weight and Health

Authors: Pirotin S, Becker C, Crawford PB

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Consumption of several new categories of ‘fortified’ sugary beverages has increased significantly in recent years. Energy drinks, sports drinks, fruit drinks, flavored waters, and sweetened teas and coffees are heavily marketed and have become popular with children and adolescents as well as adults. This report describes the results of the first comprehensive, scientific study of 21 popular sugary drinks, which was undertaken in order to understand the potential health impact on young people who consume them. Findings suggest that in most cases these  fortified sugary beverages provide little or no health benefit, in some cases the added ingredients may be harmful, and in nearly all cases drink manufacturers market these sugar-sweetened beverages as beneficial or health enhancing. Moreover, these popular drinks are a major source of sugar and add significant calories to the diets of children and adolescents diets, which increases risk of obesity.

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