Published: November 2007

ID #: 57921

Publisher: The Public Health Advocacy Institute

Authors: Miura MR, Smith JA, Alderman J

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School food environments are complex, particularly because they must function within a plethora of state, federal and local regulations. Individuals who work in this system-food service directors, superintendents, or others involved school food policy-are often left to their own devices to navigate the complex interplay of laws. In this study, legal researchers guide advocates in identifying obstacles and opportunities to changing the school food environment.

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