Published: April 2020

Journal: Nutr Res Rev

Authors: Larson N

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To inform programs and policies that promote health equity, it is essential to monitor the distribution of nutritional problems among young individuals. Common nutritional problems include overall low diet quality, the underconsumption and overconsumption of certain dietary components, unhealthy meal and snack patterns, problematic feeding practices and disordered eating. The objective of the present narrative review was to summarize recent evidence of disparities among US children (2-19 years) according to age, sex, socio-economic status, ethnicity/race and rural-urban location. Searches in PubMed® and MEDLINE® were completed to identify peer-reviewed research studies published between January 2009 and January 2019. Findings from the ninety-nine reviewed studies indicate adolescent females, young individuals from lower socio-economic households and individuals who identify as non-Hispanic Black race are particularly vulnerable populations for whom targeted strategies should be developed to address evidence of increased risk with regards to multiple aspects of nutritional wellbeing.

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