Published: March 2010

ID #: 65058

Publisher: Center for Science in the Public Interest

Authors: Wootan MG, Batada A, Balkus O

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This 34-page report examines whether companies marketing food to children have adopted a policy on marketing to children, and if so, whether those policies are adequate in adhering to nutrition-based standards. Of the 128 companies assessed, only 32% had a policy for marketing food to children. Of the companies who did, none received a grade of “A” for their policy.

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