Start Date: September 2008

ID #: 65047

Principal Investigator: Emma Sanchez-Vaznaugh, ScD, MPH

Organization: San Francisco State University

Funding Round: New Connections Round 2

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Capitalizing on a natural experiment and existing data, this project will investigate the impact of competitive food and beverage policies on child and adolescent weight status. This work specifically includes the evaluation of the impact of competitive food and beverage policies adopted by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) on patterns in BMI and racial/ethnic disparities in BMI, as well as assessment of the impact of the LAUSD policies compared to the California-wide policies on these outcomes. The population to be studied in this research includes children and adolescents in fifth, seventh and ninth grades who attended LAUSD public schools and other California public schools between 2001 and 2007.

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