Published: March 2012

ID #: 1058

Journal: Am J Prev Med

Authors: Kraak VI, Story M, Wartella EA

See more related research

Share


In a 2005 report, “Food Marketing to Children and Youth: Threat or Opportunity?”, an Institute of Medicine (IOM) expert committee concluded that prevailing food and beverage marketing practices did not support a healthful diet and provided recommendations for diverse stakeholders to promote a healthful diet to children and adolescents. This paper reviews the available evidence between December 1, 2005 and January 31, 2011 to evaluate government and school progress to achieve the IOM report recommendations. The evaluation showed that moderate progress was made by schools, school districts, and educational leaders to create healthier eating environments for students. Government made limited progress to strengthen the nation’s research capacity to understand how marketing influences diets; and made no progress to either create a national “healthy eating” social marketing campaign, or to designate a responsible agency to monitor and report on progress for all actions.

Related Research

January 2024

WIC Fruit and Vegetable Study

The Gretchen Swanson Center for Nutrition was funded by Healthy Eating Research to conduct a study exploring how the policy changes in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) cash value benefit (CVB), or fruit and vegetable money, during the pandemic impacted the WIC program and child access to fruits and More

November 2023

State Agency Perspectives on Successes and Challenges of Administering the Child and Adult Care Food Program

The federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) improves nutrition and reduces food insecurity for young children while helping cover food costs for care providers and families. Despite its important benefits, the program is underutilized. This report uses qualitative interviews with state CACFP administrators representing 28 states to explore federal and state policies and practices that support or discourage CACFP participation among licensed child More

November 2023

Supporting the Wake Forest School of Medicine in implementing a WIC referral program within electronic health records to optimize WIC participation

The United States has an ongoing maternal and infant health crisis, characterized by stark disparities. The WIC program could equitably improve health outcomes, but it is underutilized. Identifying strategies for healthcare systems to efficiently connect pregnant patients with WIC is a public health and policy priority. This study will use the electronic health record (EHR) More