Start Date: June 2006

ID #: 57920

Principal Investigator: Janet Whatley Blum, ScD

Organization: University of Southern Maine

Funding Round: Round 1

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Maine’s Chapter 51 rule represents one of the strongest current state-wide school nutrition standards in the country. Study aims: 1) examine effects of Chapter 51, on high school nutrition policies, environments and revenues and on high school student dietary behaviors; and 2) examine the influence of proximity and density of non-school food venues on high school student dietary behaviors. Data will be collected from 97 high schools regarding current and pre-Chapter 51 school food service environments, policies and revenues and survey data from 660 students from 11 random high schools. Geographical Information Systems will be used to assess proximity and density of non-school venues for 11 high schools.

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