Published: January 2011

ID #: 57920

Journal: Prev Chronic Dis

Authors: Whatley Blum JE, Beaudoin CM, O'Brien LM, Polacsek M, Harris DE, O'Rourke KA

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This article examines the effects of Maine’s statewide nutrition policy banning “foods of minimal nutritional value” in public high schools (Chapter 51). The food environment of public high schools participating in federally funded meal programs was evaluated. Researchers found a significant decrease in availability of soda in student vending machines post-Chapter 51. No significant changes were found in availability of other sugar-sweetened beverages and junk food, and these items were widely available in a la carte, vending machines and school stores.

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