Published: February 2012

ID #: 66955

Journal: Am J Public Health

Authors: Bleich SN, Herring BJ, Flagg DD, Gary-Webb TL

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This paper examines the effect of an intervention to provide caloric information about sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on the number of SSBs purchased by Black adolescents. The intervention randomly assigned urban corner stores in Baltimore City, Maryland to the following calorie information conditions which were posted on the beverage cases: 1) absolute caloric count, 2) percentage of total recommended daily intake, and 3) physical activity equivalent (i.e., minutes of jogging necessary to burn off a bottle of soda or fruit juice). While researchers found that providing Black adolescents with any caloric information significantly reduced the odds of SSB purchases, they found that providing relative caloric information in the form of a physical activity equivalent was associated with the largest reduction in SSB purchases.

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