Published: March 2013

ID #: CAS006

Journal: Pediatrics

Authors: Leung CW, Blumenthal SJ, Hoffnagle EE, et al

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Studies suggest that participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—the largest federal nutrition assistance program in the U.S.—may be associated with suboptimal dietary patterns among adults, but these associations have not been extensively examined among children. This paper discusses the results of a study that examined the overall dietary quality among a national sample of lower-income children and whether differences were present by SNAP participation in overweight and obesity status; consumption of foods and nutrients; and overall dietary quality. Findings from the study suggest that SNAP participation was not associated with a higher rate of childhood overweight or obesity, but the diets of all lower-income children are far from meeting national dietary recommendations.

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