Start Date: November 2009

ID #: 66961

Principal Investigator: Michele Polacsek, PhD, MHS

Organization: Maine Center for Public Health

Funding Round: Round 4

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Maine’s Chapter 156, the first statewide law banning junk food and beverage marketing in schools, went into effect in September 2007. No statewide policies to restrict marketing in schools exist or have been studied, and little is known about how best to create and implement marketing policy change in schools. In this study, investigators will assess compliance with Chapter 156 using a cross-sectional survey to observe school food marketing practices and assess perceptions of policies and changes since the inception of Chapter 156. Recommendations will be developed to improve legislation and school policies.

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